Planning

Hello Sunshine!

June is Upon Us…Finally we have the warm weather!

It has been a crazy Spring, by now many of you have cleaned out your closets, organized the pantry (twice) and are hoping to get back to get back to some sembelance of normal. We are feeling the same.  Our goal has always been to help families succeed. Like most of you, we are adjusting our daily routines, attempting a work-life balance and pushing through. Life does continue, preparing for college still has to happen. Summer is a time of relaxation and also of preparation for success!

Here are some well thought-out tips on how to proceed with your summer:

Upcoming Freshmen in College: 

Make sure you are communicating with your chosen college – both with the school itself and the students that are coming into the freshman class with you.  The school typically has an orientation that you can sign up for prior to stepping onto campus, and wow are they fun and student-centered!  Make sure you check out the opportunities at your new school now.  Also, jump on chats with other students to talk about your excitement of attending the school.  Plus, it’s always a great idea to reach out to your new roommate and start to divvy up what each of you will bring to your new home.

Parents, make sure you are connecting with your soon-to-be leaving student. Take them out for a one-on-one walk and offer guidance to them and also just listen.  This is a new era in your relationship with your child, make sure you approach it with everything you’ve got and then let them take the reins and run.

Keep track of when tuition, room and board and meal plan payments are due.

Find out when payments are due for the above-mentioned college expenses.  Talk to your College Funding Advisor about developing a plan to pay for all of these costs in the most efficient way possible.

Upcoming Seniors: 

You’ve made it to Senior Year!  Don’t let senioritis set in.  Begin to hone those skills you’ve developed towards identifying what will be a great major and career.

Schedule any SAT or ACT tests early.  That way you can still get them to schools before the Early Admission deadline if you choose to.  Also make sure your high schools know what schools you are applying to.  Check all deadlines on the college’s websites and any scholarship opportunities they may list as well.

Use your summer to gain skills for your activity list.  Take on a summer job or possibly shadow a career interest you may have.  You can list this on your applications in the fall.

Upcoming Juniors:

Take advantage of virutal college tours.  You may not be able to casually visit campuses but use this time to learn about the schools that interest you.  Look at the clubs, sports and even course catalogs.  You can always schedule a formal tour later if you find you really like the school.

Summer is a good time to study for the SAT and ACT tests. Begin taking practice tests and going over missed answers to really get a good idea on how to approach the material.

Get your financial game plan in place.  Make sure you are not at risk of having unnecessary calculations count against you in the financial aid process.  Talk with our funding advisor for ideas on how to develop a financial plan.

Upcoming Sophomores and Freshmen:

Plan to take challenging high school courses

With summer approaching, you’ll want to look forward to the next year in terms of class schedule.  When helping your student to determine his/her class schedule, make sure s/he enrolls in courses that are challenging but not beyond their ability to excel.

Think about reasons for attending college

High school is an opportunity for learning and growth in addition to preparing for college.  It is during this time that your student may discover interests or will continue to develop talents and skills s/he already may possess.

Enjoy the summer!  We hope you find these tips useful.

Until next month…

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Transitioning to College: 3 Differences Your Child Will Experience

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Dear Parent,

We are now fill swing back into the school year after the end-of-year break, and most students are not experiencing very many surprises at this point.  The school year often can tend to assume a feeling of sameness and even drudgery for students during the long stretch run after the holidays – other students can take the same situation and find a level of comfort in the continuity of how things run at school through this period.  It rather all depends on how the student views the high school experience, in many ways.

However, one thing to keep in mind – especially as high school continues into the junior and senior years – is that this sameness and continuity WILL NOT persist once a college-bound student reaches his goal and begins attending college or university.  College is a whole new ball game, as they say, and students need to be prepared for the changes or they could end up on the wrong side of them.

Keeping that important reality in mind, this month’s newsletter focuses on some of the biggest changes that face tomorrow’s college freshmen as they make the transition into the world of higher education.  When a student and his or her parents have taken the time to become aware of what to expect at the next level, and especially when they have actually put some time and effort into preparing to manage these important new realities that are inherent to college or university studies, the chances of a successful start – not to mention a successful finish – for this crucial educational experience increase dramatically.

Sadly, our experience shows that students who ignore these significant lifestyle and organizational changes until they are actually happening are often among those who end up struggling academically (and even socially at times).  Without wanting to seem too dramatic, we also see that these students are frequently those that find themselves in danger of failing or dropping out of college entirely.  So really, there can be no question about whether or not this stuff ultimately matters!

Without any further delay, then, here are some of the biggest changes that today’s students face when making the big leap from high school to college studies… many of them may sound familiar to those that faced earlier generations, but there are others that have come along fairly recently.  Things change in some regards, and things remain similar in other regards, and finding the balance between them is important when dealing with these kinds of coming-of-age generational gaps.

We urge you to prepare as much as possible for each eventuality, and if you need any clues or tips on how to manage them, remember that your College Funding Advisor is just a phone call or email away.  Remember that we deal with these elements each and every year and will be happy to provide insights, advice, or strategize with families who have students approaching the college years.  Here are some of the most important things that students these days will notice as they make the jump to college or university life.

Time Management

In high school, students are expected – nay, required – to go to every class, every single day. When a class is missed, there must be an excused absence. Classes that are missed or skipped by students can result in serious repercussions. Detention is the usual consequence for skipping class in high school, although there can be other forms of punishment, as well. Having had high school detention may not go on the high school transcript, but it does go on the full student record. Interestingly, this record can be requested by the college… it does not happen very often, but it is possible.

It does not necessarily reflect favorably on the student if there are “red flags” in that regard, so it is better to be on the safe side of things.  Regardless, this set of rules clearly demonstrates that the student is required to attend class or be faced with the disciplinary consequences for not doing so.

Conversely, in college, no one will be checking (or, frankly, care) whether or not your child attends class. Attending class at the next level is exclusively the responsibility of the student.  Attendance may or may not be taken, depending on the class, but the consequences are delayed and generally come strictly in the gradebook.  Attending lectures and assimilating the information and knowledge is wholly dependent on the student’s initiative to go and participate. This is, of course, a major shift in personal responsibility. While some students thrive under those circumstances, many others can tend to falter when suddenly given the duty of managing their own time and schedule – especially if this development occurs unexpectedly.

When students are fully aware of and prepared for this drastic change in personal responsibility, they can more fully take advantage of the education they are receiving. Young people who are unprepared often waste time and money because they do not completely comprehend that their lack of responsibility for their own learning is only hurting them and the ramifications have further reaching effects than simply in-school detention.

Changes in Class Size and Organization

High school classes can usually reach a maximum of approximately 35 students. Compare that to college, where some lecture halls can seat literally hundreds of students at a time. This difference can be a shock to high school students who are used to and expecting more individualized attention. In classes where there are hundreds of students, it is simply impossible for a professor to accommodate and give personalized attention to that many students.

There are often graduate students who serve as teaching assistants, but these can vary in quality (many are excellent, but some are pretty darned awful) and it can really place the onus on the new college student to navigate his or her way into the best learning options both in lecture and in office hours, etc.  Incoming college students will also need to prepare for the need to take excellent notes and listen attentively, because not doing so could result in the loss of important information.  This is also good information to know for students who prefer a smaller class experience. Private schools often tend to be smaller and therefore can provide the more intimate and individualized experience some students desire.

This is something to consider before applying to any set of colleges and universities. In general, the bigger the college, the bigger the class size!  That may or may not be something that affects your child one way or the other, but it is important to remember when planning.

Learning to Take Initiative

College is not the place for students who need or what their hand held. Higher education requires that students begin to grow up and take responsibility for themselves, and this can sometimes be a significant challenge for those who are not adequately prepared. One of the ways that students will need to do this is by taking initiative for themselves.

While in high school, a student who may be struggling in a subject or class would likely be approached by the teacher to establish some kind of protocol for assisting the student to better learn the material. This might be letting the parents know about the difficulty the student is having, or working personally with the child to help him or her better grasp the material.

This approach generally does not happen in college. If the student in a college class is having difficulty in the class, the student is responsible for seeking out and choosing appropriate measures to better master the material. This could entail approaching the teacher and letting him or her know that there is a lag in assimilating the subject matter. The teacher and student could then strategize together about what measures could be taken going forward that could help the student better learn the subject material. Once again, however, the onus for this process remains with the student. If the student does not take the initiative to better grasp the material or make it known to the professor that he or she is having difficulty then the risk increases of failing the class.

As we mentioned above, students who are preparing for their college years will do well to consider these altered circumstances well before the time comes for them to head off to their freshman year experience.  Yes, many high schools will take a strong role in helping college-bound kids to understand, develop, and implement strategies in this regard – but others may not.  For this reason, we are pleased to work with parents and students on any of the details surrounding the college preparation and application processes.  We have years of experience and knowledge in this regard, as well as helping parents to prepare financially for their significant part of the overall college burden.

This breadth of knowledge allows us to be uniquely qualified for helping families with their college preparation, and if we may be so bold as to say so, helps to make us one of the most valuable resources available for parents and students during the pre-college years.  We have a wide variety of programs and educational plans in place to help parents with the financial part of the college question.

Among our more successful educational options for providing this crucial information directly to the parents of high school kids is via our popular College Funding Workshops.  These workshop presentations are delivered live by experienced College Funding Professionals, and they target the families of today’s college-bound students with the most current information available.  Based on responses from our past attendees, these workshops do an excellent job of providing the most pertinent information that parents definitely need throughout this crucial time of college preparation.

The workshops are always organized purposefully for locations and times (with evening and weekend times available) that tend to work well for parents. There are never any admission fees charged for the workshops, but we do require a reservation in order to optimize the learning environment and maintain safety standards.  To reserve a place in one of the upcoming workshops, or if you have any questions about the workshops themselves, please simply place a call to our office staff.  Our phone number is (614) 934-1515 and our staff will be happy to help you further.

Our workshops are certainly a wonderful option for gaining information, but we also recognize that some parents will wish to read up on the foundational aspects of college funding preparation for themselves.  With this fact in mind, we have prepared a wonderful written report that provides a strong, basic overview of this crucial information.  Our report deals with the most important points regarding financial requirements and planning for parents of college-bound students, and we are justifiably proud of the way that it covers the process in an understandable manner.

Our report is titled “Nine New Ways To Beat The High Cost of College,” and we are happy to offer it as a free resource to learn the basics regarding the financial requirements for a college or university education.  To receive your own no-obligation copy of this valuable “Nine New Ways To Beat The High Cost of College” report in the mail, you can simply request one from our staff at (614)934-1515. We appreciate your interest and it will be our pleasure to send out a copy to you right away.

Until next month,

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Parenting Tips to help your Kid Succeed in College

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“Top Parenting Tips That Will  Help With College Admissions, Funding, And Academic Success”

Dear Parent,

The overall success of a college bound high student, as well as his or her success in the years of higher education, comes down to a variety of elements.  Some of them are well within our sphere of influence as College Funding Professionals and many of them really are not.  There are elements that will affect a student’s success that are tied into how well that child is able to adapt to the college environment, his or her maturity level, and a myriad of other things that need to be in place – or at least in a well-developing stage – when a college-bound student graduates from high school.

This month’s newsletter emphasizes some of these important elements that will quite literally affect the trajectory of a young person’s life in college and beyond.  Granted, we recognize that it is not our place to tell parents how to achieve these goals, and that is certainly not our intent.  There are plenty of parenting resources and experts available to help in that regard.  However a family comes to help young people develop the skills necessary for success in college, the simple fact remains that students who have these skills and levels of maturity will outperform their peers who are lacking in this regard in almost every instance.

We urge parents to take a look at these tips, and consider the best ways to implement strategies that will help their students to excel in these areas.  We are always pleased to review them with parents and college-bound students to show how these things can make a huge difference over the long haul when it comes to college admissions, success, and even funding.  With this information, as well as any other queries that we might be able to answer face-to-face, families will find themselves to be well-situated when it comes to preparing young people for the college experience.

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CREATE PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY

One of the most important things surrounding college readiness is the development of personal responsibility in a student.  Some parents these days tend to intervene with astonishing regularity in high school affairs (academic, social, and otherwise) – this can certainly be counterproductive at the high school level, but it is extremely damaging at the college and university level.

At college, students are required to manage their academic affairs effectively with their professors and classmates.  They are required to be timely and reliable with their assignments, and to exhibit an appropriate level of integrity in their work.  There is no room for outside entanglements with parents at the college level, and it is the job of the student to manage these things properly.

High school (and even junior high school) are the perfect time to develop these skills and a high level of reliability and responsibility.  Teachers will appreciate the effort, certainly, and the level of stress for a family goes down considerably as high school students become more and more responsible as young adults.

We are huge proponents of students being responsible, not only academically, but also financially, which leads to our next tip…

LEARN FINANCIAL COMMON SENSE

Even the best-laid college financial plans can be completely and utterly destroyed if a brand new college student does not know have a clue about how to manage his or her money properly.  We have (unfortunately) seen this happen more times than we care to remember, so trust us when we say… this is vitally important!

Each and every year there are students – even gifted, intelligent students – who undermine their academic futures with a simple inability to manage a budget.  Bear in mind that there are plenty of adults who have similar problems, but for this reason it is all the more important for students to learn these skills in high school, or even well before that.

Students who can keep a budget will find that they are also able to function at the college level without the financial stress that plagues so many families during the years of higher education.  That can honestly, in and of itself, improve a grade point average pretty significantly!

There is also little doubt that being able to organize, plan, and stick to a budget demonstrates a level of maturity that spills over to academic work at the next level.  This is a skill, and it is something that can be learned… far too many schools no longer offer training in this, so if it is not available in your school district then it could be a very good idea to seek other resources to get these skills in place!  It will serve a student well both during his or her college education, and later in life, as well.

DEVELOP EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

Emotional intelligence may not be one of the standard skills taught in high school, but it is an incredibly important characteristic to have in one’s life – especially when entering the college years. Having a high emotional intelligence is something that should also be developed along with other parts of a child’s academic and extracurricular life.

The ability to understand and manage one’s own emotions, not to mention the emotions of others, is not only crucial in interpersonal relationships and college success, it is also a vital life skill. When it comes down to it, we are all in relationships, and this reality expands dramatically throughout high school and into college and university experiences. Relationships need to be maintained and nurtured throughout our lives. Navigating emotions, self-awareness and an understanding of the motivations and emotions of others can be critically useful in business and interpersonally. It affects the choices a person makes and offers important tools that are important for any highly effective and inspirational leader.

While some believe you are born with a certain degree of emotional intelligence, it can also a set of skills that can (and should) be learned during the teen years. Just like any other type of knowledge, emotional intelligence can be learned and developed experience and personal interactions, which must be a part of the educational process.  Most importantly, emotional intelligence is a huge part of maturity – which is one of the key elements of success in college and beyond.

AND ONCE AGAIN… START EARLY!

When they say that it’s never too early to prepare your child for college, it is partially true. While showing a powerpoint slideshow of all of your personal top-tier colleges while your child is in the crib may seem like a good idea, that actually may be a *little* early. However, it IS a good idea to get a jump start on prepping your child for college at the beginning of his or her adolescence.

Adolescence is a great time because your child’s curiosity about the future is just beginning to blossom. Questions about life and the world can become topics of conversation for the average 10 or 11 year old. Colleges are interested in nurturing future leaders. If your child is curious about how the world works and what the future holds for him or her, then it is imperative to properly nurture that curiosity.

Recently, a group of incoming Ivy League freshmen were interviewed regarding preparing for the rigors of college, and also were asked to share what advice they had to share with younger students. The response was overwhelmingly, “start early.” Managing high school academics and activities can be difficult. Applying for college can be difficult. It is an advantage to start as early as possible getting acquainted with the process, helping your child establish clear goals, and finding help where it is needed.

Again, the ways that different families will go about instilling these skills and abilities in young people may vary significantly, but the proof is ultimately in the pudding, as they say.  The most important thing is that any college-bound student is able to function appropriately and successfully at the next level.  This builds a foundation for his or her future both during studies and afterward.

We have a keen interest in helping students and their parents to be well prepared in every way for the rigors and challenges inherent to higher education.  Because of this, we make it our business to provide appropriate educational and informational avenues that help families to be extremely well prepared for this important step.

Among our more exciting teaching options for this type of pertinent and timely information are our popular College Funding Workshops.  These live presentations are offered by certified College Funding Professionals and are targeted specifically to the parents of the college-bound high school students of today.  Attendees agree quite uniformly that these presentations offer a high yield of valuable information regarding the college funding details that families truly need in their college preparations.

We make it a point to schedule workshops so that parents are able to attend, even with work and other full schedules. We never charge an admission fee for workshop attendance, but for planning purposes and to prevent overcrowding we do require a reservation in advance.  For additional information, or if you wish to save a seat for an upcoming workshop, simply call our office (614) 934-1515.

We are convinced that our workshops are a great resource, but we are also aware that it is easier for some parents to learn about the basics for college funding preparation away from such a setting, for whatever reason.  Therefore, to make sure that the information is available readily to as many parents as possible, we also publish a written report covering similar information.  This publication also reviews the financial elements important for the families of today’s college-bound young people.

Our report is titled “Nine New Ways To Beat The High Cost of College,” and it is a consistently excellent and valuable resource for covering the basic elements regarding the financial requirements for college or university education.  For a no-obligation copy of the “Nine New Ways To Beat The High Cost of College” report, simply give our office a call at 614.934.1515.  We will be delighted to put a copy into the mail for you right away.

Until next month,

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Pick me! How to get colleges to ‘fight’ for your student

                                                                                

“How To Get Colleges To Fight Over YOUR Student

For Their Incoming Freshman Class

Dear Parent,

As summer kicks off officially, it is definitely a good time to take a well-deserved break from the stressors of school (for both students AND parents), and we urge you to enjoy this vacation time to the fullest, no matter where it may take you.  We also, however, cannot miss an opportunity to share some of our insights as College Funding Professionals as to how a family and a high school student can best prepare for the future at the next educational level… it is what we do, and we are pleased to continue our efforts even during the vacation months.  (Although, it might be rather nice for you to read this month’s newsletter while reclining in a lounge chair with a cold beverage in-hand… just a suggestion!)

As the time approaches for high school students to apply for admissions to colleges and universities – and it is gradually approaching, even during the summer months – it is good to focus on the things that enhance a student’s standing as an applicant to colleges and universities down the road.  Like almost every other thing we talk about in these newsletters, the earlier students and parents start with this process, the better off they will be in the long run.

Students can often become so wrapped up in the process of selecting schools and deciding on where to apply, that it can seem like the colleges are the only ones making a real decision – that the students are putting in their applications and just hoping for the best possible result.  Well, this is not necessarily true.  It is – at least to some degree – for many students, unfortunately, but there is also a subset of college applicants who will find themselves in the proverbial driver’s seat when it comes to deciding where they will attend college

While they might or might not be admitted to every single school to which they apply, these students find themselves in the enviable position of having multiple schools from which to choose, and in the best circumstances they may also find the schools sweetening their offers to compete for their attendance!  This is invariably a circumstance that occurs when preparation and planning come together during the early stages of high school, but getting the ball rolling in this direction can be started anywhere along the path.

Yes, multiple acceptances from colleges and universities who are willing to compete for a student is a best-case scenario, but it is certainly NOT out of the question for students who make wise decisions and are willing to prepare themselves during the high school years for their college experience.  Here are a four specific tips to consider to help your student become a pursued candidate when the time comes for college application.

Strategy 1: Academics Matter (Obviously)

It should come as no surprise that schools are going to want to see academic performance when it comes time to apply.  Kids who have been working hard on their schoolwork in high school – and have earned the grades to show for it – will often move up significantly in the admissions cycle of colleges and universities.

Now, there are some specialized circumstances that might be able to help overcome a less-impressive GPA, but there is NEVER a circumstance where a high GPA is considered a detriment – and all other things being equal, the kid with the higher GPA will get additional consideration almost every time.

It is also important to note that academic extras during the high school years, such as Advanced Placement (AP) courses and International Baccalaureate (IB) work, can give a significant extra “boost” to an application at most (but not all) schools, as well.  Special honors in different subjects can also carry some additional weight, if there is a specific topic that a high school student excels in.

The bottom line is that students in high school need to take their high school transcript seriously.  If they do, it will serve them well in the future.  If there is anything that we can do to assist in making this foundation of your child’s college application as solid as possible, please let us know.

Strategy 2: Find (AND Develop) Talents

It might seem cliché, but it is true: every student has his/her own set of talents.  For some kids it is really easy to see their talents.  The terrific athletes, and the wonderful singers, and the student body officers can be picked out by most people without having to look very hard.  However, there are many other talents that can help a student in the quest to become a recruited applicant at his/her most desired schools.

The most important thing is for students to actively seek the things that they can do well, and find their talents.  This can come through school, through extra-curricular activities, through community activities, or even through their own reading and/or research.  Granted, sometimes finding these talents comes quite easily.  Other times it can turn into a bit of a longer search.  Because of this, it is important to start early and identify some of these areas of emphasis as soon as possible.

Regardless, though, once students have identified these talents, it is vital for them to find ways to develop their gifts.  This can take a variety of different methods depending on what talents are being grown.  We also recognize that different families will have different possibilities when it comes to how their kids are able to pursue their passions and talents.  Regardless of what these special gifts are, colleges and universities love to see young people who have taken the time and opportunity to develop themselves in a variety of areas and interests.  We can certainly assist in this regard, if you have any questions about finding and/or developing the talents of your high school student.

Strategy 3: Do Your Best To Nail Those Admissions Tests

There is really no way to avoid the importance of the SAT and/or ACT in applying for college admission these days.  No, these tests are not the end-all-be-all, and there are some students who wind up successful without knocking the top off of the bell curve of standardized testing, but the simple fact is that students who perform well on the SAT and/or ACT will almost always have a much easier time with the admissions cycle in general (assuming the other parts of a strong application are in place, of course).

What this means, of course, is that the tests need to be taken seriously, and they need to be prepared for appropriately.  We have extensive experience in assisting with all aspects of this, including helping students who may have had testing challenges in the past to do their best on exam day.  This is yet another area where preparation, as early as possible, can make a huge difference in the eventual outcome.

Optimal preparation for these tests can also vary considerably from student to student.  Some young people will require different types of preparation than others will – even to achieve similar results – and it is ultimately to every student’s benefit to determine precisely what the best preparation regimen will entail to ensure an outcome that will serve as an application strength and not a red flag.

Remember also that, regardless of how the exams go – and we are dedicated to helping make them go as smoothly as possible – we are also dedicated to assisting with ALL aspects of the application process after the exams, to find the best possible institution for your child’s academic endeavors.

Strategy 4: Start Correspondence With Schools… Early

As soon as a high school student has come up with a preliminary list of colleges and universities that interest him/her, it is a good idea to request information from the institutions directly.  It can also be helpful to contact specific departments at these colleges or universities, especially if there are areas of academic interest that the student might wish to pursue after high school.

These early contacts can definitely pay dividends later, especially since a student can become a “known entity” by the time the college application period rolls around. Departments may have scholarship opportunities, and may also have some input that can be of value for admissions committees.

It is also easy enough to add or remove schools from the list as the high school years progress.  Sometimes interests can be amended over the course of four years, and there is nothing wrong with editing the list of potential schools in accordance with these changes through the years.

Now, if you are looking for specialized advice or assistance in making these contacts with the schools that interest your high school student, please feel free to discuss them with us – your college funding advisor, will have years of experience in how to manage this kind of correspondence for the ultimate benefit of the student!

Although it is summer, now is the time consider some of these elements from this month’s newsletter.  Even during vacations from school, it is important for young people to focus on developing their talents and perhaps even visiting some college campuses that interest them.  Regardless what your plans will entail, remember that we are here to help with turning these plans into a reality – and when the time comes we are ready and experienced in working with applications, admissions questions, and all elements of financial awareness regarding the college and university years.

One of the main ways that we help the parents of college-bound high school students, especially when it comes to learning more about the money side of higher education, is by presenting our popular, live College Funding Workshops.  These workshops, offering in-the-flesh presentations from the most knowledgeable college funding experts in the area, provide a tremendous service for parents who are trying to optimally prepare themselves for the financial side of their student’s upcoming college or university years.  The presentations offer parents both accurate and timely details, providing information that can make a great positive difference for attendees!

Our workshops are offered without cost or obligation to all participants, but because there are seating limitations (and because we always insist on a great learning environment), we must insist on advance reservations for the presentations.  Should you have any questions about the workshops coming up in your immediate area, just ask our workshop staff – they are available at 614.934.1515.  We can help with any questions regarding details, locations, dates, as well as other workshop-related information.  Of course, we are also happy to handle reservations for those who have already decided to attend.

Aside from the workshops, we also have a published report for parents who looking for current information on how to best manage and plan for upcoming college expenses.  We have developed this report specifically with these parents in mind, and it is called “Nine New Ways To Beat The High Cost of College.” Just like the workshops, we offer the report completely free of charge and without any obligation.  To receive a personal copy of “Nine New Ways To Beat The High Cost of College,” simply call our staff at 614.934.1515.  We will be more than happy to email one to you immediately.

Until next month,